Good bye 2014, Hello 2015!

Happy New Year from the Cow Palace!

Happy-New-Year

We’re ready for everything ahead in 2015.

Happy MOO Year everyone!

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* Photos via:
http://beechtreemd.com/news/index.php/2013/12/happy-new-year-2/
http://savethecow.wordpress.com/2013/01/01/happy-new-year-2013/
http://savethecow.wordpress.com/2012/01/01/happy-new-year-2012/
http://squarecowmovers.com/the-art-of-mooving/how-to-find-a-new-babysitter-for-moo-years-eve/
http://aimeekitty.dreamwidth.org/775363.html

What do you think? : Coca Cola Making Milk

Coca-Cola got a lot of attention in November when it announced that it was going into the milk business. Not just any milk, mind you: nutritious, reformulated supermilk.

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It also invited ridicule. “It’s like they got Frankenstein to lactate,” scoffed Stephen Colbert on his show. “If this product doesn’t work out, they can always re-introduce Milk Classic.”

In fact, the idea for New Milk didn’t come from Coca-Cola at all. It emerged from a huge, high-tech dairy farm in Indiana.

That dairy, called Fair Oaks Farms, doubles as America’s one and only dairy theme park, a bit of Americana that interrupts a monotonous stretch of Interstate 65 between Chicago and Indianapolis.

It grabs the attention of drivers with a series of tank trucks parked broadside like billboards in fields beside the highway. Painted on the tanks are cryptic messages: “We Dairy You To Exit 200.” Then: “We Double Dairy You.” The final tank truck has two huge fiberglass cows mounted on top of it.

The pitch may be goofy, but the farm is serious business. It’s one of the biggest and most sophisticated dairies in the country, and it is home to 37,000 cows, divided among 11 different milking operations.

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{Full story here}

*via NPR – The Salt
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/12/25/372664332/inside-the-indiana-megadairy-making-coca-colas-new-milk

Abundant California rain aids rangelands, fills stock ponds

All the rain that’s fallen on California is doing wonders for rangelands, but livestock producers are still relying on supplemental feed. Much more rain will be needed for ranchers to start replacing animals that were sold off because of the drought.
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RED BLUFF, Calif. — All the rain that’s fallen on Northern California in December has done wonders for rangelands, but it’s still too soon for ranchers to start planning for the end of drought conditions.

Ranchers are still supplementing feed with baled hay and other grains, even as fields and hillsides are lush and green as a result of precipitation that has approached records in some areas.

“After the years of drought we’ve had, it’s nice to actually have a fall like this,” said Josh Davy, a University of California Cooperative Extension livestock advisor here.

The abundant rains not only help the grass grow but also fill stock ponds, Davy said.

“We’ve had enough rain that there’s been some runoff and we’ve started to see these ponds fill up, which is crucial to winter grazing,” said Sunol, Calif., rancher Tim Koopmann, the California Cattlemen’s Association’s immediate past president. “At my place, we’ve had 9.3 inches of rain since the first of November.”

Three years of drought have taken their toll on forage lands throughout California, but annual grasslands have shown tremendous improvement lately, Koopmann said. The grass still has high water content, but it will gain nutritional value in a few weeks as it starts to harden, he said.

Aiding in the growth have been relatively warm temperatures, as most lower elevations have recorded “100-degree days” in which afternoon highs and nighttime lows add up to more than 100 degrees, aiding the soil, Koopmann said.

While Northern California has seen plentiful rainfall, precipitation in the Central Valley and areas south has varied, noted Mark Lacey, a CCA board member who runs cattle on several properties south of Fresno.

A property in the foothills near Visalia has received nearly 8 inches of rain this fall, while another at the south end of the valley has gotten about an inch and a half, he said.

“It’s starting to respond depending on where it’s at and how much rain it’s had,” Lacey said of the rangeland.

The rainy fall and early winter comes as cattle have been moved to lower elevations. The weather has helped fields, too, as rain has aided the emergence of a wheat crop of which 80 percent was rated good or excellent, the National Agricultural Statistics Service reported.

{Full story here}

*via Capital Press
http://www.capitalpress.com/20141222/abundant-calif-rain-aids-rangelands-fills-stock-ponds

Did you know: 10 Things About Cows

Here are 10 things about cows that may astound you:

1. Cows are smart.

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The idea that cows are dumb is a myth. Cows are actually very intelligent, curious and able to think critically and solve problems. Studies have shown that cows are capable of learning associations and using past experiences to determine their future actions. When faced with a challenge, cows get very excited with elevated heart rates and brainwaves. Some cows even jump in the air as if they are yelling, “I did it!”

2. Cows remember everything.

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If you find yourself in the presence of a cow, be nice to her because she will remember you. Cows have great memories and are very good at remembering and recognizing faces even after long periods of time. Cows also have good spatial memory. They can remember where things are located such as food, water, shelter, best grazing spots and most importantly, the location of their babies.

3. Cows are highly emotional.

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Even cows have mood swings. They are unhappy when the weather is bad and practically smiling when it’s sunny outside. Like humans, cows seek pleasure and love to play. When let outside after being cooped up for too long, cows run, prance and jump with joy. Sometimes, however, a cow just wants to be left alone because she’s not feeling well and isolates herself from others. Cows can be moody and sensitive. They may dislike certain individuals and can hold a grudge for years against other cows and people who have crossed them.

4. Cows form close friendships.

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Cows form strong bonds and friendships, choosing to spend much of their time with just a few preferred individuals. They even have best friends. Studies have shown that when cows are with their BFFs (Bovine Forever Friends), their stress levels decrease and when separated from them, their stress levels increase. Cows help each other, learn from each other and make decisions based on compassion and altruism. They even form grooming partnerships where they can do each other’s hair.

5. Cows can be popular.

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It may sound a bit like high school but cows have a social hierarchy with a Queen Bee…uh, Cow. There is often one cow in the herd who is seen as the boss and who dictates behavior to the rest of the cows. Any cows that don’t follow the leader will become isolated from the herd. When new cows are introduced to a well-established herd, she will have to network and build relationships until she is accepted into the pack.

6. Cows love their babies.

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The most powerful relationship for a cow is that between a mother and baby. Cows have strong maternal bonds and are attentive, protective and loving parents. When allowed, a mother cow may nurse her calf for as long as three years. The mother-child bond continues after weaning; mothers and their children remain close to each other for life. There is also a sense of maternal community as other cows in the herd will help nurture calves if necessary.

7. Cows grieve deeply.

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Because cows form such strong bonds with their loved ones, it is only natural that they show signs of grief when separated from them. When a calf is taken away, the mother will cry and bellow for hours, even days, and fall into a deep depression. Mother cows will search for their babies, visibly distressed, just as the calves cry for their mother.

8. Cows say more than moo.

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While cows do “moo” to communicate, they also use different body positions and facial expressions. Another way cows “chat” is by mimicking each other’s actions. If one cow gets up from eating and starts walking across the field, other cows may get up and follow. This group behavior and networking is a type of communication between the cows.

9. Cows are affectionate and forgiving.

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If you have never given a cow a belly rub, you should put it on your bucket list. Cows love to be petted, stroked and scratched behind the ears. They are very loving and welcome interactions with kind people. Even cows who have been mistreated or abused in the past can heal over time, forgive and learn to trust people again.

10. Cows can live up to 20 years.

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When cows are not enslaved in the meat and dairy industry, their natural lifespan can be up to 20 years. That is over 4 times the life expectancy of cows used for food. Cows raised for meat are slaughtered when less than 2 years old and calves killed for veal don’t get to live more than a few months. Cows used in the dairy industry are sent to slaughter when their milk production slows, usually around the age of 4. Obviously, cows were intended to share this Earth with us for a much longer time.

Now that you know so much about cows, be sure to go meet one. Visit one of the many animal sanctuaries where cows get to live in peace and safety and maybe even give one a belly rub. I promise it will be a “moo-ving” experience.

* via http://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/things-to-love-about-cows/

After Sneaking It Into Her House, This Little Girl Cuddles With Her Baby Cow And It’s Adorable

Five-year-old Brennan Decker probably shouldn’t have let her baby cow into the house, but thank goodness she did, because otherwise we wouldn’t be able to witness this adorable moment:

Luckily for little Miss Brennan, once her mom saw the love between cow and girl, it was impossible to be mad.

* via BuzzFeed
http://www.buzzfeed.com/maycie/little-girl-cuddles-with-her-cow-after-letting-it-into-her-h?bffbvideo