‘Ark’ animal terminal coming to JFK airport

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In what’s being touted as the first of its kind, John F. Kennedy International Airport will soon open a new terminal dedicated entirely to animals.
Called “The Ark,” the $48 million, 178,000-square-foot multi-purpose animal handling and air cargo facility will include a large animal departure and arrival lounge, an overnight pet resort run by Paradise 4 Paws, and an East End Veterinary Emergency and Specialty Center. Quarantine and transport services for both large and small animals will also be provided — including birds, snakes and other critters. It’s expected that The Arkwill handle at least 70,000 domestic and wild animals annually.
“For the animals who pass through The Ark, as well as the people who own them, air travel can be stressful and confusing,” Cliff Bollmann, an architect at Gensler, one of the firms designing the facility, told The Independent. “Our design team sought to create a comfortable, healthy environment for them all.”
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Unlike what humans have to endure in some terminals around the world, the well-being of animals within The Ark will be a top concern. So as not to discomfort some species, transport from aircraft, terminals, or cargo areas will take place in climate-controlled vehicles. “The design allows planes to taxi directly to the building, so horses can be transported in a seamless fashion that reduces stress,” Lachlan Oldaker of Gralla Equine Architects told the Equine Chronicle. In addition, the design of the livestock transport handling system is being spearheaded by animal welfare advocate Temple Grandin.
Over the course of its planned 30-year lease in the long-empty Cargo Building 78 at JFK, The Ark will create roughly 180 full-time jobs and generate revenues estimated at $108 million for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.
“ARK’s investment of $48 million into JFK will transform an airport structure that has been vacant for nearly 10 years into a world-class specialty cargo facility, and the agreement guarantees the Port Authority more than $100 million in revenue without any additional capital investment,” Port Authority Executive Director Pat Foye said in a statement.
The Ark is expected to start operations at JFK Airport in 2016.

* via MNN
http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/animals/blogs/ark-animal-terminal-coming-to-jfk-airport#ixzz3QLEVcjEL

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Horse Swirlology – What do you think?

Interesting posted by Chuck Nifong who shared Beadle Lake Large Animal Clinic’s status.
….Many of people have ask over the years …. What does the Swirl mean, well here you go. My Grandfather taught me this many years ago and I have found it to be TRUE
Swirlology 101- (whorl patterns). Have you ever wondered what the whorl pattern on your horse’s forehead means. Some old timers have said it can be the gateway to the soul. See if you agree.

A swirl located between the eyes indicates an easy going, uncomplicated horse.

Swirls higher on the forehead indicate intelligence and a more reactive nature.

Long swirls, especially those that extend below the eye indicate a friendly and agreeable nature.

Multiple swirls can indicate multiple personalities. High and tight side by side swirls can mean a horse that is super focused and talented, but challenging and difficult in the wrong hands.

2 swirls on top of each other can mean extreme personality swings and unpredictability.

Multiple swirls that form a Z pattern can signal a horse that is dangerous and violent.

The direction that the whorl turns can tell you if the horse is right or left “handed” (or hoofed) . If the whorl flows counterclockwise it is left “handed”. If the whorl flows clockwise it is right “handed”. Tell us any other wives tales you have heard about whorl patterns.

* vis Grand National Rodeo
https://www.facebook.com/GRANDNATIONALRODEO

Sunday’s Winners for the 116th GGKC Dog Show

BEST IN SHOW:

GCH Seacreast’s Not What You Think Breed: Newfoundland

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For the list of Sunday’s winners: http://goldengatekennelclub.com/winners-sunday/

* via Golden Gate Kennel Club
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Golden-Gate-Kennel-Club/307046281553

Get ready, GGKC Dog Show is almost here!

The Golden Gate Kennel Club Dog Show is happening THIS weekend, January 24th and 25th at the Cow Palace!

The Golden Gate Kennel Club All-Breed Dog Show features a fabulous fashion show, fantastic flyball demonstrations, and beautiful breeds. It’s a fun event for everyone, from professional breeders and handlers to casual dog lovers!

What is a benched dog show?
Benched dog shows are a rare breed (pardon the pun), with only a few still existing in the United States. They are unique because the dogs are on display throughout the show, not only during events or judging. This means that you have a chance to interact with the dogs and get to know them more personally.

When?
January 24th and 25th, 2015.
Box Office open 8am-5pm.
Best in Show judged daily. 

Where?
The Cow Palace in Daly City, California

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FASHIONSHOW

french+bulldog

vintage+dog+show

* via Golden Gate Kennel Club
http://goldengatekennelclub.com/

 

California conservation projects in new USDA Regional Conservation Partnership Program

RCPP

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has announced that 115 high-impact projects across all 50 states and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico will receive more than $370 million in federal funding as part of the new USDA Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP).  In addition, these projects will leverage an estimated $400 million more in partner contributions—for a total of nearly $800 million—to improve the nation’s water quality, support wildlife habitat and enhance the environment.  Vilsack made the announcement near Phoenix, where the new program will invest in a project with five local partners to clean and conserve water along the Verde River, a tributary of the Colorado River.

“This is an entirely new approach to conservation efforts,” said Secretary Vilsack. “These partnerships empower communities to set priorities and lead the way on conservation efforts important for their region. They also encourage private sector investment so we can make an impact that’s well beyond what the Federal government could accomplish on its own.”

The RCPP competitively awards funds to conservation projects designed by local partners specifically for their region. Eligible partners include private companies, universities, non-profit organizations, local and tribal governments and others joining with agricultural and conservation organizations and producers to invest money, manpower and materials to their proposed initiatives.

Through the RCPP, partners propose conservation projects to improve soil health, water quality and water use efficiency, wildlife habitat, and other related natural resources on private lands.

Four of the selected projects are connected to California:

1) Expansion of Waterbird Habitat – The current sequence of events for rice production creates a situation where birds are frequently left with abrupt changes in habitat availability. The proposal extends the “watering” season of flooded rice fields beyond just the production phase and adds shallow water habitat in the winter/spring and fall months. This proposal supports the California Rice Commission in expanding the Waterbird Habitat Enhancement Program (WHEP) by 50 percent, thus enhancing the wildlife value of 165,000 acres of rice and the long term sustainability of rice agriculture.

2) Rice Stewardship Partnership – The Rice Stewardship Partnership, composed of Ducks Unlimited, the USA Rice Federation, and 44 collaborating partners, will assist up to 800 rice producers to address water quantity, water quality, and wildlife habitat across 380,000 acres in Mississippi, Arkansas, California, Louisiana, Missouri, and Texas.

3) Tricolored Blackbird Habitat – The Tricolored Blackbird once was abundant in California with a population in the millions. It now has an estimated 145,000 birds remaining statewide, and many predict that it is heading toward extinction. This proposal is a partnership between the dairy industry and conservation groups, with Audobon California as the lead partner, to address the factors that challenge California dairy farmers and threaten Tricolored Blackbirds, with the goal of finding a sustainable solution for management of colonies on farms and saving the Tricolored Blackbird from extinction.

4) Klamath-Rogue Woodland Health and Habitat Conservation – Many at-risk and listed species depend on quality oak woodlands that are threatened by conifer encroachment, densification, and severe wildfires in this project area, covering portions of Oregon and California. Working with landowners, including historically underserved producers, and using a sound, science-based approach, the partners will target 3,200 high-priority acres recently identified in a Conservation Implementation Strategy to preserve, enhance, and restore the structural diversity, ecological function, and overall health and persistence of oak habitats and their watersheds.

A complete list of the projects and their descriptions is available on the NRCS website.

* via CDFA Planting Seeds Blog
http://plantingseedsblog.cdfa.ca.gov/wordpress/?p=7543

Merry Christmas from the Cow Palace!

Wishing everyone a very Merry Christmas!

Enjoy these photos!

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christmas-cow

Cow Xmas

* via
http://www.zazzle.com/merry_christmas_santa_cow_wall_decall_sticker_walldecal-256846216193679740
http://ruminator3.blogspot.com/
http://authenticlifejourneys.com/2013/12/13/all-is-calm-all-is-bright/
http://pinsandwhiskers.blogspot.com/2010_12_01_archive.html

Did you know: 10 Things About Cows

Here are 10 things about cows that may astound you:

1. Cows are smart.

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The idea that cows are dumb is a myth. Cows are actually very intelligent, curious and able to think critically and solve problems. Studies have shown that cows are capable of learning associations and using past experiences to determine their future actions. When faced with a challenge, cows get very excited with elevated heart rates and brainwaves. Some cows even jump in the air as if they are yelling, “I did it!”

2. Cows remember everything.

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If you find yourself in the presence of a cow, be nice to her because she will remember you. Cows have great memories and are very good at remembering and recognizing faces even after long periods of time. Cows also have good spatial memory. They can remember where things are located such as food, water, shelter, best grazing spots and most importantly, the location of their babies.

3. Cows are highly emotional.

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Even cows have mood swings. They are unhappy when the weather is bad and practically smiling when it’s sunny outside. Like humans, cows seek pleasure and love to play. When let outside after being cooped up for too long, cows run, prance and jump with joy. Sometimes, however, a cow just wants to be left alone because she’s not feeling well and isolates herself from others. Cows can be moody and sensitive. They may dislike certain individuals and can hold a grudge for years against other cows and people who have crossed them.

4. Cows form close friendships.

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Cows form strong bonds and friendships, choosing to spend much of their time with just a few preferred individuals. They even have best friends. Studies have shown that when cows are with their BFFs (Bovine Forever Friends), their stress levels decrease and when separated from them, their stress levels increase. Cows help each other, learn from each other and make decisions based on compassion and altruism. They even form grooming partnerships where they can do each other’s hair.

5. Cows can be popular.

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It may sound a bit like high school but cows have a social hierarchy with a Queen Bee…uh, Cow. There is often one cow in the herd who is seen as the boss and who dictates behavior to the rest of the cows. Any cows that don’t follow the leader will become isolated from the herd. When new cows are introduced to a well-established herd, she will have to network and build relationships until she is accepted into the pack.

6. Cows love their babies.

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The most powerful relationship for a cow is that between a mother and baby. Cows have strong maternal bonds and are attentive, protective and loving parents. When allowed, a mother cow may nurse her calf for as long as three years. The mother-child bond continues after weaning; mothers and their children remain close to each other for life. There is also a sense of maternal community as other cows in the herd will help nurture calves if necessary.

7. Cows grieve deeply.

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Because cows form such strong bonds with their loved ones, it is only natural that they show signs of grief when separated from them. When a calf is taken away, the mother will cry and bellow for hours, even days, and fall into a deep depression. Mother cows will search for their babies, visibly distressed, just as the calves cry for their mother.

8. Cows say more than moo.

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While cows do “moo” to communicate, they also use different body positions and facial expressions. Another way cows “chat” is by mimicking each other’s actions. If one cow gets up from eating and starts walking across the field, other cows may get up and follow. This group behavior and networking is a type of communication between the cows.

9. Cows are affectionate and forgiving.

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If you have never given a cow a belly rub, you should put it on your bucket list. Cows love to be petted, stroked and scratched behind the ears. They are very loving and welcome interactions with kind people. Even cows who have been mistreated or abused in the past can heal over time, forgive and learn to trust people again.

10. Cows can live up to 20 years.

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When cows are not enslaved in the meat and dairy industry, their natural lifespan can be up to 20 years. That is over 4 times the life expectancy of cows used for food. Cows raised for meat are slaughtered when less than 2 years old and calves killed for veal don’t get to live more than a few months. Cows used in the dairy industry are sent to slaughter when their milk production slows, usually around the age of 4. Obviously, cows were intended to share this Earth with us for a much longer time.

Now that you know so much about cows, be sure to go meet one. Visit one of the many animal sanctuaries where cows get to live in peace and safety and maybe even give one a belly rub. I promise it will be a “moo-ving” experience.

* via http://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/things-to-love-about-cows/